Biodiversity Mammals

Indus Blind Dolphin

Written by Saman Ansari

Pakistan’s mapping of biodiversity won’t be complete without discussing the ever famous endangered Indus Blind Dolphin is also nick named bhulan. 

According to geologists, 100 years ago the friendly mammal lived through the 3500 km long Indus River and it’s tributaries but now has been confined to 1,375 km stretch of lower main Indus. The species is generally found alone or in small groups in the deepest channel of the River.

The population has drastically decreased due to the construction of barrages which has fragmented the population. According to WWF’s official site only about 1,100 exist today in Lower Indus in Pakistan.

Did you know? The Indus river dolphins are one of only four river dolphin species and subspecies in the world that spend all of their lives in freshwater. They are believed to have originated in the ancient Indus river dolphins are one of only four river dolphin species and subspecies in the world that spend all of their lives in freshwater. They are believed to have originated in the ancient Tethys Sea. When the sea dried up approximately 50 million years ago, the dolphins were forced to adapt to its only remaining habitat—rivers.. When the sea dried up approximately 50 million years ago, the dolphins were forced to adapt to its only remaining habitat—rivers.

The dolphin has now adapted to life in the muddy river and are functionally blind. They rely on echolocation to navigate, communicate and hunt prey including prawns, catfish and carp.

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About the author

Saman Ansari

A virologist in making, with special interest in emerging viruses, vaccines and science magazines. She is also the founder of Biologydecoded.com